Epson Launches World’s First Paper Recycling System For Office Use

[cs_section style=”margin: 0px; padding: 45px 0px; “][cs_row style=”margin: 0px auto; padding: 0px; ” inner_container=”true”][cs_column style=”padding: 0px; ” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/1″][cs_text]A breakthrough in paper recycling comes to the office space – you feed waste paper in, and in just three minutes you get clean sheets of paper that feeds out every 5 seconds! Printer giant Epson has announced its office-scale paper recycling system that is also the first of its kind called the PaperLab. With this new paper recycling equipment, you can securely and efficiently recycle even the most confidential documents and choose among various kinds of paper to yield – all in the confines of an office, without ever going to a dedicated paper recycling center.[/cs_text][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][cs_section style=”margin: 0px; padding: 0px; “][cs_row style=”margin: 0px auto; padding: 0px; ” inner_container=”true”][cs_column style=”padding: 0px; ” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/1″][x_video_embed no_container=”true” type=”16:9″][/x_video_embed][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][cs_section style=”margin: 0px; padding: 45px 0px; “][cs_row style=”margin: 0px auto; padding: 0px; ” inner_container=”true”][cs_column style=”padding: 0px; ” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/1″][cs_text]PaperLab comes with great flexibility for paper options. It can be fed with any paper and feed it out in various formats, such as A4, A3, Letter, and so on. Also, PaperLab can be customized for the output paper’s thickness and weight, which opens up various options for the kind of paper you want: you can choose to have a very thin onion-skin paper, to ordinary business-grade paper, to business cards and even scented paper.

According to Epson, the PaperLab is the world’s first paper recycling machine to utilize a so-called “dry process” in the making of new paper from waste paper. In a conventional sense, paper recycling operations require huge amounts of water to break down the paper fibers and bind them together again. For the PaperLab, it only needs a relatively tiny amount of water to regulate the working humidity inside the machine.[/cs_text][x_image type=”none” src=”https://www.gizmocrazed.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/epson-paperlab-2.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][cs_text]There are two main processes used in PaperLab’s paper-making operation. First, fiberization is a process that reverses waste paper back into its original constituents of cottony fibers.

Epson did not provide specific details on how this works, but it is presumed to be a classified piece of technology which could be patented.

The second process is called binding, in which the fiberized paper fibers from the waste paper feed are bound together again. In the binding stage, PaperLab uses various kinds of binders to yield a wide range of papers. Here, the user can choose to have colored papers or even scented papers, for example.

For the final stage, a pressure forming stage dictates the thickness, size, and weight of the output paper.

One of the key strengths of the PaperLab is its ability to output new paper at a rate of 14 pages per minute (ppm) – or approximately a sheet of paper every 5 seconds.

In the long run, companies and offices could seek for the PaperLab’s convenience to replace the habit of buying new paper supplies, but for now we can’t tell the efficiency or the environmental impact of this system in contrast to just buying new paper instead of recycling.[/cs_text][x_image type=”none” src=”https://www.gizmocrazed.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/epson-paperlab.gif” alt=”epson paperlab” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][cs_text]Epson’s PaperLab will be initially available in Japan next year, noting that key places outside Japan will have the system “at a later date.” There are no pricing details, yet – with the breakthrough paper-recycling technology built into it, expect the PaperLab to cost a fortune, which makes it truly intended for large-scale commercial use.[/cs_text][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section]