Snowbird: The First Successful Human-Powered Flapping-Wing Aircraft

Advertisements


Human-powered flight is not new to people, but to create a working human-powered ornithopter has been a dream shared by inventors and tinkerers since the 1800s. Now, The Aviation history is made when the University of Toronto’s human-powered aircraft with flapping wings became the first of its kind to fly continuously.

1118 Snowbird: The First Successful Human Powered Flapping Wing Aircraft

The “Snowbird” performed its record-breaking flight on August 2 at the Great Lakes Gliding Club in Tottenham, Ont., witnessed by the vice-president of the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), the world-governing body for air sports and aeronautical world records. The official record claim was filed this month, and the FAI is expected to confirm the ornithopter’s world record at its meeting in October.

Under the power and piloting of Todd Reichert, an Engineering PhD candidate at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS), the wing-flapping device sustained both altitude and airspeed for 19.3 seconds, and covered a distance of 145 metres or 475 feet at an average speed of 25.6 kilometres or 16-mph per hour.

The lead developer and project manager Reichert says: “The Snowbird represents the completion of an age-old aeronautical dream. Throughout history, countless men and women have dream of flying like a bird under their own power, and hundreds, if not thousands have attempted to achieve it. This represents one of the last of the aviation firsts.”

240 Snowbird: The First Successful Human Powered Flapping Wing Aircraft

The Snowbird weighs just 94 lbs. and has a wing span of 32 metres (105 feet). Although its wingspan is comparable to that of a Boeing 737, the Snowbird weighs less than all of the pillows on board. Pilot Reichert lost 18 lbs. of body weight this past summer to facilitate flying the aircraft.

With sustainability in mind, Aerospace Engineering graduate students of UTIAS learned to design and build lightweight and efficient structures. The research also promoted “the use of the human body and spirit,” says Reichert.

“The use of human power, when walking or cycling, is an efficient, reliable, healthy and sustainable form of transportation. Though the aircraft is not a practical method of transport, it is also meant to act as an inspiration to others to use the strength of their body and the creativity of their mind to follow their dreams.”

The Snowbird development team is comprised of two University of Toronto Engineering graduate students: Reichert, and Cameron Robertson (MASc 2009) as the chief structural engineer; UTIAS Professor Emeritus James D. DeLaurier as faculty advisor; and community volunteers Robert and Carson Dueck. More than 20 students from the University of Toronto and up to 10 exchange students from Poitiers University, France, and Delft Technical University, Netherlands, also participated in the project.

“This achievement is the direct result of Todd Reichert’s dedication, perseverance, and ability and adds to the already considerable legacy of Jim DeLaurier, UTIAS’s great ornithopter pioneer,” said Professor David Zingg, Director of UTIAS.

“It also reflects well on the rigorous education Todd received at the University of Toronto. We’re very proud of Todd and the entire team for this outstanding achievement in aviation history.”


Via Science Daily

Advertisements


Popular On Web Today

2 Responses to " Snowbird: The First Successful Human-Powered Flapping-Wing Aircraft "

  1. Said says:

    hi
    good idea , University of Toronto is the best but i have a question why you did not put a propeller ?

  2. [...] Tweet Humans have been trying to fly since long before the Wright Brothers achieved their first flight in 1903, but apparently human-powered planes are not good enough for some people as this team broke the height record with their human-powered helicopter. [...]

Leave a comment

You must be Logged in to post comment.